What Do You Want to Accomplish This Month?

Do you start your months with a plan?

If you defined 1 key thing to achieve this month and accomplished it, how would you feel? What if you did that for 12 months? How awesome would 12 key changes be in a year? If you batted .500, how awesome would 6 key changes be?

Outlook October Web

Most people fall into two camps:

1. The Planners (guilty as charged!)

The folks have goals within their goals and subgoals under their goals’ goals. There are venn diagrams, mindmaps, outlines, and twenty different iPhone apps to manage it all.

These people have 18 daily habits they want to accomplish. They have 7 accountability partners, one for each area of their lives: financial, family, work, financial, health, spiritual, mental, and community participation.

Often, this group ends up overwhelmed by their plans. They plan, but they struggle with acting because their goal charts have so many tentacles. Where does one even start?

2. The Seat of the Pants Flyers

These folks don’t mess with all of that. It stresses them out. It’s not intuitive enough. When they write a goal down and don’t accomplish it, they feel more guilty than challenged to do better.

As a result, they drift. They get work done, but at the end of the month (or whatever time period), there is less to show for their efforts than they had hoped.

Where do you fall?

I know I’m mostly in the first group. I set up these big plans. I am all amped to tackle the world and conquer every character defect, monetary issue, career goal, and fitness feat out there.

Then I can tend to get overwhelmed, shut down, and just try to get my work done.

That’s not horrible. It’s good to get good work done.

But if we decided we wanted to make big strides in one area, what’s the best way?

A Suggested Method for Change

I will block comments from my wife as she might call me out as ‘not an expert’, but I do know that when I succeed at specific things, this following system seems to be the reason.

  1. Select 1 thing to focus on. I would suggest choosing only 1. You’ll be tempted to choose more. For instance, if you say, “I want to exercise early in the morning 4 days a week,” you’ll be tempted to make wholesale eating changes. Don’t do it! Focus on one and only one. If there is some collateral improvements, great.
  2. Connect a ‘SMART” goal to this single focus: Exercise 4 days a week for the next month in order to be 3 lbs lighter at the end of the month than at the beginning. It’s specific. It’s measurable. It’s actionable. It’s realistic. It’s time-bound. Make it simple.
  3. Give yourself grace: This is the key, especially when you’re doing this for the first time. If you haven’t been exercising in the morning, and you end up only nailing 2 mornings a week, still celebrate! It might be 8 more times than before. And don’t quit just because you didn’t hit your number. Keep slogging. You didn’t develop a no-workout habit overnight. Why should you develop a ‘workout’ habit overnight?
Why Is an Insurance Guy Writing about Goal Setting?

We’re all trying to accomplish things. You might have a corporate goal to serve a certain number of people. Set a number and go after it. Or a fundraising goal or a volunteer recruiting goal.

So there’s not really a great reason except for we’re all human beings and if you happened onto this blog, that means you read business-type stuff. We’re allowed to talk about goals anytime we want.

Consider October a month to enjoy the beautiful weather and forge new ground in one area.

I’m going to go decide on mine. I’ll let you know how it turns out (if you remind me).

 

Comments

  1. brentmkelly says:

    Brett, this is definitely one of my biggest weaknesses. I am a good idea guy, but a terrible execution guy. I love to follow the shiny new objects. One of my favorite acronyms is FOCUS. follow one challenge until success.

    • Me too (and I love that acronym, too). I can tell when I’m in the ‘shiny object zone’ when I see that I have like 9 tabs open on Chrome. 🙂

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